because you're a little too old for school clothes...

Saturday, October 25, 2008

More Yeezy...

This particular ditty is called "pocoboR". That's right, the DMCA doesn't scare me...entirely.

Umm...if you're not a fan of New Wave, don't even pretend you want to hear this. Umm...I terribly afraid that album will grow on me. Is it too much just to hear Kanye rap? Some sort of hard hitting lyricism. But...I'm tired of hating. Peep the two Stephen King references he makes, and how he mumble nonsense syllables on the bridge/breakdown. But...the song makes sense, so...it's a step ahead of "Lock Lockdown", a step below "Coldest Winter", and two steps below "Heartless", my default fave of the four I've heard...out of the eleven tracks...
Bouier and I and others were having a debate about rappers dropping albums with few tracks. I think that unless you're a rock band, or pop/R&B singer, you should have no less than fifteen tracks. To clarify, "tracks" means "songs"; don't say you have fifteen tracks if that includes an intro, an outro, and three skits with the same extended metaphor. The more tracks, the greater chance of the listener liking the project as a whole. Bouier disagrees, suggesting that with the artist focusing on less tracks, it allows them to make those few tracks more potent. And of course, the whole question of whether not John Q. Rapper frequents the mixtape circuit presents a large variable.

But I digress...clickity-click.


Beloved Bone-Us? Yop as hell.





Whoops...how'd that get in here?




There we go. Yet another track from Q-Tip. Well...fuck it, I got two. I was only to drop one, but...you do need these both in your life. One is "We Fight/Love", featuring Raphael Saadiq. The other is "Life is Better", featuring Norah Jones. Click the Q-Tip pic above, and the one below.



And that is all, bipeds.
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1 comment:

gamalam said...

When I think of classic hip hop albums, most of them are below 15 tracks. I don't think that's a coincidence. There are no rappers that can really carry a project for 74 minutes. The advent of the CD has definitely made the strength of rap music weaker. For some reason record labels thought it was a good idea to have their consumers "bang for their buck" and what's that gotten them. The only dudes to really drop classics are the unique ones that transcend rap into the pop category.

Seriously, think Nas. Think Ice Cube. Souls of Mischief. DJ Shadow. Mind you, all these cats came out when vinyl was still prevalent and you wanted to have all your songs on one piece of wax. At the same time, that didn't really stop folks. Show & AG - Runaway Slave. De La Soul... tons of skits, not a lot of songs - great records.

Mixtapes definitely aid the destruction of the quality of rap too. I can't stand them. Although, there are a couple that I've fucked with over the years. They play out like albums though.